Developmental Disability and the Right to Vote with Peter Berns

“The fact that someone may not be able to manage their finances or may need other supports doesn't necessarily mean that they shouldn't and can't vote. So, they may need to fight to gain their rights back so that they can participate in elections.”

National General Interest

Title two of the “Americans with Disabilities Act” requires state and local governments to ensure that people with disabilities have an equal opportunity to vote.  However, in some states, many with intellectual and developmental disabilities are denied that opportunity. A conversation with Peter Berns, Chief Executive Officer of The ARC.

Describing the issue, as it relates to court-appointed guardianship, Berns stated, “The fact that someone may not be able to manage their finances or may need other supports doesn’t necessarily mean that they shouldn’t and can’t vote. So, they may need to fight to gain their rights back so that they can participate in elections.”

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